Muesli

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When my children had corn eliminated from their diet, basically all breakfast cereals went with it. My daughter used to love cereal but it has taken me a long time to find suitable cereals for them to have again. I have managed to find a safe puffed rice and crunchy rice flakes. Since I mixed up this muesli I have even found safe sunflower seeds and pepitas!!! Adding the seeds to the mix is a great way of adding protein to breakfast cereal. Also, since my Easter Hot Cross Bun post I have found some safe sultanas that my daughter doesn’t react to – it’s all progress and exciting. This can be a breakfast or a great afternoon snack to keep the kids, and grown ups, going.

Ingredients:

  • Puffed rice (in Australia the brand I use is Nature First Organic)
  • Crunchy rice flakes (in Australia the brand I use is Nature First Premium)
  • Sultanas and/or other dried fruits (in Australia the brand I use is Woolworths Select  Aussie Sultanas)
  • Sunflower seeds and pepitas [pumpkin kernels] (in Australia the brand I use is Coles own brand from the health section range)
  • Honey, golden syrup, or maple syrup
  • Banana (or other fresh fruits)
  • Suitable milk (we used Rice Milk)

Method:

  1. Decide on the quantity you are mixing up; if it is just a bowl to serve straight away or a week’s worth for the family
  2. In a mixing bowl (or the bowl you are serving in), add equal parts of puffed rice and crunchy rice flakes (this makes up the base of the cereal. So, you could either combine two whole packets, add a cup of each or just add a bit of both to the bowl you are about to serve.
  3. I then add the sultanas to make a nice amount through the dried muesli. Next time, I will try the sunflower seeds and maybe pepitas at this stage as well. You can add anything you think will work for your dietary requirements.
  4. To serve I chop a ripe banana over the muesli, drizzle with honey, and add milk.

If you give this recipe a try please let me know how it turns out. I’m happy to troubleshoot or discuss how you could substitute these ingredients if some of the ones I’ve used aren’t suitable for your family’s sensitivities.

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Pancakes!

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Easter Saturday morning surprise for the family – Pancakes! I have finally mastered this recipe so that I can reliably whip them up quickly any day for breakfast, then keep them cold for an afternoon snack (lunch box idea) or a cold breakfast treat the next day. I have to say with my new Thermomix I can make this in a matter of moments. On the downside, my son now knows he can ask for pancakes and get them pronto! I’m just happy they can have such a yummy breakfast that I know is full of goodness. My son eats them straight out of the pan, but my daughter likes them with margarine and jam. Whichever topping you choose, just ensure it is allergen safe, too. My favourite topping so far is chopped banana and honey. I have written the ingredients list using grams so that either the regular method or Thermomix method can be used.

Pancakes

Ingredients:

  • 60 g white rice flour
  • 60 g brown rice flour
  • 40 g tapioca/arrowroot flour
  • 360 g (1.5 cups) of rice milk (or coconut, or prescription formula, etc) [I use calcium rich milk]
  • 1 Tb Golden syrup (or honey or maple syrup or rice syrup)
  • 1 tsp guar gum
  •  1.5 tsp baking powder

Method:

  1. Whisk all ingredients together
  2. Add additional milk if needed to make it up to the consistency you like
  3. I use margarine in a non-stick electric frying pan and cook over a medium heat

Thermomix Method:

  1. Place all ingredients in the bowl.
  2. Mix on speed 2 for 20 seconds, scrape down
  3. Reverse mix on speed 4 for 15 seconds
  4. Add additional milk if needed to make it up to the consistency you like
  5. I use margarine in a non-stick electric frying pan and cook over a medium heat

If you give this recipe a try please let me know how it turns out, I’m happy to troubleshoot or discuss how you could substitute these ingredients if some of the ones I’ve used aren’t suitable to your family’s sensitivities. For example, if your family doesn’t tolerate rice, then other flours could be tried, such as: millet, sorghum or quinoa. If the arrowroot isn’t suitable, another starchy flour is potato.